IRS Criminal Investigations Unit Boasts 94 Percent Conviction Rate

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The cases that the criminal investigations unit at the Internal Revenue Service sends to the tax division have a 94 percent conviction rate, making it the highest rate of conviction in law enforcement, Rick Raven, deputy chief of IRS investigations, said March 2.

Offshore tax evasion is taking up a lot of the unit’s time, Raven told the Federal Bar Association Section on Taxation’s 36th Annual Tax Law Conference.

“It’s not just a Switzerland problem,” he said, referring to UBS, which was forced in 2009 to hand over details on more than 4,000 accounts held by U.S. taxpayers and pay steep fines to avoid prosecution for tax fraud.

More international banks are under investigation than at any time in the history of IRS Criminal Investigation, he said. More than 300 investigations of individuals with ties to international banks are underway, with IRS looking for hidden money overseas.

‘We Know Just About Everything’

The IRS has a new repository of sources about offshore accounts due to its voluntary disclosure program, in which U.S. taxpayers voluntarily disclose offshore assets. Part of that deal is that they cooperate with the government, he noted.

“By the time our special agents show up, they have done trash runs on this taxpayer, they have talked to informants, they have talked to business partners, they could have brought in an undercover [agent]. We know just about everything before we go and talk to that taxpayer,” he said.

Fraud referrals, in which IRS revenue agents refer cases to criminal investigations for possible fraud, are also yielding good results, up 38 percent so far this year compared to last year, and the number of those accepted for investigation is also rising, he said.

The complete text of this article can be found in the BNA Daily Tax Report, March 5, 2012. For comprehensive coverage of taxation, pension, budget, and accounting issues, sign up for a free trial or subscribe to the BNA Daily Tax Report today. Learn more »

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  • Alexander K writes about Mr. Eschenbach’s conmmet: about making people ‘middle class’ will not go down well with large numbers in the UK, where rational discussions using internationally accepted social classifications just do not work. The term ‘Midlle Class’ is used as an epithet by many university-educated people in the UK who use their own parents’ or grandparents’ working class origins as a badge of pride and identity; they stoutly maintain their own membership of the ‘working class’ against all comers. – I first came across this in New Zealand when a Welsh scientist I worked with, a world-class botanist, an all-round good bloke, a wonderfully popular lecturer and an accomplished classical guitarist who grew up in a Welsh mining community, immediately became very angry when another Kiwi colleague innocently described the Welshman as ‘middle class’. – “My father and his father’s father worked down the Pits all of their working lives; I am working bloody class and proud of it!” – It is a commonplace here to see newspaper articles about ‘sharp-elbowed middle class parents stealing the education chances of working class children’ etc, which I find absurd. I once told a group of teaching colleagues here in London that it was ‘our mission as teachers to attempt to make all of our students middle class.’ they failed utterly to understand what I was attempting to say and I immediately became an object of suspucion and dislike. I had proclaimed myself to be one of the despised middle class! – There are plenty of cultural differences between folks in these United States and people in the Commonwealth countries, and this is a great example.American politicians and similar thieving liars have spent the past century and more peddling the idea that every average private citizen should expect a middle-class standard of living regardless of his or her real role in the economy.To be called working class in America is an insult. Thus we get people who are living from paycheck to paycheck in hourly-wage jobs, their mortgaged-to-the-hilt single-family homes teetering on the edge of foreclosure, unable to pay their absolutely horrible government-school-supporting real estate taxes, and who have no hope or expectation of ever bettering their condition, being called middle class. What really defines middle class anywhere? I’m of the impression that it’s a matter of entrepreneurial autonomy and responsibility. The proprietor of a mom-and-pop corner convenience store who runs his own business, and supports his family from the profits he gets thereby is middle class. The government thug employee who fills in an amount four times greater as adjusted gross income on his IRS Form 1040 is also supposed to be middle class, but that extremely well-paid malevolent jobholder does not make a single real budgetary or hire-and-fire decision at any time in the course of his employment.The corner store proprietor has to pay the overhead required to keep his business open, and must be present to serve his customers, or he makes no money. He works for no salary, has no hourly wage, is accorded no benefits he does not pay for directly. He can fail. Lots of such small businessmen fail every year.Same thing for the privately practicing certified public accountant, the lawyer, and the doctor. If you’re not there to provide your customers, your clients, your patients with the services for which they elect to pay, you don’t make any money.That’s the real definition of middle class in America. The pretense of middle class otherwise is a gaudy, hideous duplicity.Might could be that the above-mentioned Welsh botanist ( world-class or not) is living in a state of delusion. If he’s initiating original research, submitting grant applications, making key decisions on equipment to be purchased, which personnel to hire, retain, and discharge .Well, like it or not, he’s performing management functions. That’s another criterion under which middle class status can be determined, right?]]>

  • 4 Rivier College’s Annual Campus Security and Fire Safety Report 2010 Introduction The Jeanne Clery Filename : AnnualCrimeReport.pdf Fullpath : /ps/AnnualCrimeReport.pdf Publisher : rivier.edu Found at Sunday, 5 Jun 2011 GMT Further secheras : ps annualcrimereport pdf or rivier college or site:rivier.edu Short link:

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